Google is expanding back into China. What does that mean for freedom of information?

Google will expand into China and launch a new search engine compliant with the Chinese government’s strict censorship rules, according to a recent report by The Intercept’s Ryan Gallagher. Versions of the app have been called “Maotai” and “Longfei,” and could launch in as soon as six months — once the Chinese government approves the … Continue reading “Google is expanding back into China. What does that mean for freedom of information?”

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How to remove yourself from search engine results

How to secure your digital identity. With the recent deployment of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679 (otherwise known as the GDPR), it has never been easier for EU citizens to have their personal details removed from computer systems. The wording within the GDPR when defining personal information is extremely broad: “personal data”  shall … Continue reading “How to remove yourself from search engine results”

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When the threat is in your home: Online privacy, security and domestic violence

As digital citizens, we often think about how to secure our internet activity and communications from external sources, including Internet Service Providers, governments, and malicious hackers.  For some, including journalists and dissidents, maintaining privacy and security from third parties is an essential part of protecting their lives and liberty, and breaches can have dire consequences.  However, … Continue reading “When the threat is in your home: Online privacy, security and domestic violence”

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  • Jul 28, 2018
  • Glyn Moody
  • News, Open Source, Privacy, Programming, Security,

Why Gmail’s new “confidential mode” is not so great for privacy, and potentially awful for the open Web

Gmail is used by well over a billion people worldwide, making it one of the most important online services. Google has recently started rolling out a new design that includes novel features. One of the most interesting of these is the so-called “confidential mode”. At first sight, that sounds like good news for privacy: “With … Continue reading “Why Gmail’s new “confidential mode” is not so great for privacy, and potentially awful for the open Web”

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  • Jul 25, 2018
  • Derek Zimmer
  • Governments, Networking, Open Source, Privacy, Security,

The Internet Cannot be Trusted – Beamsplitters, Backdoors, and Broken Promises

We all know that the Internet is not a fundamentally safe place. With the tremendous gains in information sharing and the conveniences that the Internet brings, come opportunities for exploitation. Fraud, harassment, surveillance, censorship, social and political manipulation, industrial and political espionage, data theft and discrimination have all taken hold in one of the greatest … Continue reading “The Internet Cannot be Trusted – Beamsplitters, Backdoors, and Broken Promises”

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  • Jul 21, 2018
  • Glyn Moody
  • Governments, News, Privacy,

Should Facial Recognition Technologies Be Regulated by the Government? Microsoft Says ‘Yes’

Facial recognition technology represents one of the most serious threats to privacy. That’s for two principal reasons. Perhaps the most important is that it is almost impossible to change our faces: serious plastic surgery apart, there are few effective techniques to disguise our bodily appearance. Masks may hide our features, but are too cumbersome – … Continue reading “Should Facial Recognition Technologies Be Regulated by the Government? Microsoft Says ‘Yes’”

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OpSec – Staying Private Under Surveillance

OpSec – Staying Private Under Surveillance One of the biggest mistakes that people make while trying to operate  privately on the internet is giving up their information over side-channels. That is, they break operational security through a misunderstanding of technology or by simply outing themselves behaviorally. This article is intended to give you a list … Continue reading “OpSec – Staying Private Under Surveillance”

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  • Jul 15, 2018
  • Danica Sergison
  • Copyright, Governments, Net Neutrality, Privacy,

Trading more than horses: Threats to privacy, net neutrality in international trade negotiations

When we’re discussing the internet, it’s not surprising that legislation and policy can have an impact that extends far beyond one country’s borders. While many of us are aware of domestic threats to fair dealing, privacy, and net neutrality, including regulator proposals and proposed legislation, it’s also important to consider the role that international trade … Continue reading “Trading more than horses: Threats to privacy, net neutrality in international trade negotiations”

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Dark Patterns: How Tech Companies Use Interface Design to Undermine Online Privacy

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force back in May. One reason many people know about the GDPR is because they were bombarded with emails asking them to accept updated privacy policies as a result. Another is that some companies have required people to agree to new terms and conditions when they … Continue reading “Dark Patterns: How Tech Companies Use Interface Design to Undermine Online Privacy”

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TV Addons: Legal battle against Canadian media giants demonstrates severe consequences facing developers accused of copyright infringement

Earlier this year, a coalition of Canadian media groups including Bell, Rogers, Quebecor, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, presented a controversial proposal to the Canadian telecommunications regulator to implement a website-blocking system and independent agency to respond to online piracy.  While the “FairPlay Coalition” is seeking additional tools to respond to piracy and copyright infringement, … Continue reading “TV Addons: Legal battle against Canadian media giants demonstrates severe consequences facing developers accused of copyright infringement”

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