• Jul 28, 2018
  • Glyn Moody
  • News, Open Source, Privacy, Programming, Security,

Why Gmail’s new “confidential mode” is not so great for privacy, and potentially awful for the open Web

Gmail is used by well over a billion people worldwide, making it one of the most important online services. Google has recently started rolling out a new design that includes novel features. One of the most interesting of these is the so-called “confidential mode”. At first sight, that sounds like good news for privacy: “With … Continue reading “Why Gmail’s new “confidential mode” is not so great for privacy, and potentially awful for the open Web”

0

  • Jul 11, 2018
  • Derek Zimmer
  • Linux, Open Source, Programming, Security,

Reproducible Builds – Solving an Old Open Source Problem to Improve Security

One of the billion-dollar problems in the world of computers is getting software to act reliably. Fundamentally, when software misbehaves, it leads to flaws that can impact performance, reliability and security. One of the best things about computers is that they do exactly what you tell them to do. One of the worst things about … Continue reading “Reproducible Builds – Solving an Old Open Source Problem to Improve Security”

0

Private Internet Access goes Open Source

Today marks the start of an exciting shift over here at Private Internet Access. As long-time supporters of the Free and Open Source Software community, we have started the process of open sourcing our software, and over the next six months we will be releasing the source code for all our client-side applications, as well … Continue reading “Private Internet Access goes Open Source”

13

  • Feb 5, 2018
  • Glyn Moody
  • Governments, News, Privacy, Programming, Security,

The real Strava heatmap story is not threats to national security, but about privacy and de-anonymization

At the end of January, Nathan Ruser posted a tweet about Strava, a Website and mobile app used to track athletic activity via GPS coordinates. It concerned Strava’s global heatmap: “the largest, richest, and most beautiful dataset of its kind. It is a visualization of Strava’s global network of athletes,” as the company puts it. … Continue reading “The real Strava heatmap story is not threats to national security, but about privacy and de-anonymization”

0

  • Nov 22, 2017
  • Glyn Moody
  • News, Privacy, Programming, Security,

The latest threat to your online privacy: exfiltration of personal data by website session-replay scripts

Last week, Privacy News Online reported on a worrying trend of increased surveillance in the workplace. This kind of spying includes capturing every keystroke workers make. The practice is regarded in many jurisdictions as acceptable because people are working on equipment provided by their employer, and use it to carry out tasks for the company … Continue reading “The latest threat to your online privacy: exfiltration of personal data by website session-replay scripts”

2

  • Nov 13, 2017
  • Glyn Moody
  • News, Privacy, Programming, Security,

Welcome to the brave new world of workplace surveillance

Here on Privacy News Online, we write a lot about government surveillance and its impact on privacy. Sadly, constant spying has been normalized to such an extent that workplace surveillance is a thriving new business sector that startups and established companies are rushing to serve. For example, InterGuard promises “complete end-user auditing and control”, and … Continue reading “Welcome to the brave new world of workplace surveillance”

0

  • Oct 20, 2017
  • Glyn Moody
  • Governments, News, Privacy, Programming, Security,

Good news on the privacy front: no more EU demands for crypto backdoors

Governments all around the world hate encryption. Unless they are being incredibly cunning by pretending they can’t break strong encryption when they can, this seems to be because crypto really does keep messages and data safe from prying governmental eyes. Banning strong encryption is clearly a non-starter – even the most clueless politician knows by … Continue reading “Good news on the privacy front: no more EU demands for crypto backdoors”

0

  • Oct 18, 2017
  • Glyn Moody
  • News, Privacy, Programming,

Powerful and pervasive artificial intelligence is coming: now is the time to talk about its impact on privacy

Artificial intelligence (AI) is rather like the GNU/Linux desktop: every year is the one when it will finally take off. Indeed, this has been true for AI far longer than for the GNU/Linux desktop, since it is generally held that AI as a discipline was born back in 1956, whereas the GNU project only started … Continue reading “Powerful and pervasive artificial intelligence is coming: now is the time to talk about its impact on privacy”

0

  • Sep 25, 2017
  • Glyn Moody
  • Governments, Privacy, Programming, Security,

The race to save online privacy: what happens when quantum computers can break all our crypto?

Although many people are well aware of the many threats to their privacy, there is an underlying assumption that the use of strong encryption will always be available to mitigate those problems. Governments will doubtless continue to push for backdoors in encrypted Internet services like WhatsApp. But even if they do get their way by … Continue reading “The race to save online privacy: what happens when quantum computers can break all our crypto?”

1

  • Sep 21, 2017
  • Glyn Moody
  • News, Privacy, Programming, Security,

Opening the black boxes: algorithmic bias and the need for accountability

Here on Privacy News Online we’ve written a number of stories about the privacy implications of DNA. There’s an important case going through the Californian courts at the moment that involves DNA and privacy, but whose ramifications go far beyond those issues: “In this case, a defendant was linked to a series of rapes by … Continue reading “Opening the black boxes: algorithmic bias and the need for accountability”

1