• Sep 23, 2020
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments, Social Media, Surveillance,

Web sites shared over 100 trillion pieces of our personal data last year: time to stop real-time bidding’s blatant disregard of privacy

Last week Privacy News Online wrote about developments in the long-running battle between the privacy campaigner Max Schrems and Facebook. One of the key issues there is the failure by the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) to act on the initial complaint made by Schrems seven years ago. That matters, because under EU law, Ireland … Continue reading “Web sites shared over 100 trillion pieces of our personal data last year: time to stop real-time bidding’s blatant disregard of privacy”

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  • Sep 17, 2020
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments, Surveillance,

Latest developments in the long-running and crucial Schrems vs. Facebook GDPR privacy battle

Back in July, this blog reported on a major victory for the privacy campaigner Max Schrems at the Court of Justice of the European Union, (CJEU). Following that win, the big question now is: what effects will it have on the handling of personal data by the Internet giants? A quick fix is unlikely, but … Continue reading “Latest developments in the long-running and crucial Schrems vs. Facebook GDPR privacy battle”

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  • Aug 19, 2020
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments, Social Media, Surveillance,

Max Schrems files 101 complaints across 30 European countries to turbocharge GDPR’s impact – and he’s not the only one

Last month, Privacy News Online discussed another major win for the privacy activist Max Schrems. The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), the EU’s top court, agreed with Schrems that the Privacy Shield framework, one of the two main ways of sending personal data about EU citizens across the Atlantic, was invalid. The … Continue reading “Max Schrems files 101 complaints across 30 European countries to turbocharge GDPR’s impact – and he’s not the only one”

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  • May 27, 2020
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments,

Top EU data protection agency under pressure to act against Internet giants as GDPR turns 2 years old

A few weeks ago, this blog noted that there were questions hanging over the GDPR, not least the fact that no major fines had been issued against top Internet companies. The GDPR has just passed the two-year mark, and many have taken the opportunity to weigh in on this issue. For example, the data protection … Continue reading “Top EU data protection agency under pressure to act against Internet giants as GDPR turns 2 years old”

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  • May 1, 2020
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments,

Is the GDPR failing? If it is, how can it be saved?

The coronavirus pandemic rightly dominates the headlines, including those of the privacy world, but in the background, life goes on. For example, companies operating in the EU are still subject to the GDPR, two years after it first came into operation. But as this blog noted a few months back, there are increasing fears that … Continue reading “Is the GDPR failing? If it is, how can it be saved?”

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  • Feb 7, 2020
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments,

Why the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) risks turning into a paper tiger

Ireland’s Data Protection Commission (DPC) has just announced two new GDPR inquiries. One of them concerns Tinder, as a result of “concerns raised by individuals both in Ireland and across the EU”. The other inquiry will examine Google’s processing of location data and the transparency surrounding that processing. The issue is whether consent to share … Continue reading “Why the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) risks turning into a paper tiger”

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  • Jan 6, 2020
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments,

Why 2020 will be make or break time for transatlantic personal data transfers

The transfer of personal data lies at the heart of much of online activity. Since many of the leading online companies were founded and have their headquarters in the US, that typically means that huge quantities of personal data cross the Atlantic every day. If information concerns EU citizens, those data flows are governed by … Continue reading “Why 2020 will be make or break time for transatlantic personal data transfers”

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  • Oct 23, 2019
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments,

ID card scandal deepens: Irish government vows to defy Data Protection Commission’s ruling against Public Services Card

Two years ago, Privacy News Online wrote about Ireland’s plans to introduce an identity card by stealth. The Irish government pretended that its Public Services Card (PSC) was not an identity card and that its use would not be mandatory. As this blog noted back then, that clearly wasn’t true, because the PSC was indispensable … Continue reading “ID card scandal deepens: Irish government vows to defy Data Protection Commission’s ruling against Public Services Card”

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  • Jun 7, 2019
  • Glyn Moody
  • General Privacy News, Governments,

General Data Protection Regulation one year on: what next?

A previous post discussed what has happened in the world of the GDPR during its first year. Although only a few rulings have been handed down, there are many legal complaints working their way through the system that could have important implications for the EU. And far beyond, too, as more countries consider bringing in … Continue reading “General Data Protection Regulation one year on: what next?”

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  • Aug 7, 2017
  • Glyn Moody
  • Cybersecurity, General Privacy News, Governments,

Ireland planning to introduce national identity cards by stealth, with no debate and unclear privacy safeguards

National identity cards are an emotive topic. In the UK, the ID card debate raged for years before and after the authorities there passed a law in 2006 to introduce them. Five years later, a change of government saw the law being repealed as a result of widespread public concerns. The Irish government seems to … Continue reading “Ireland planning to introduce national identity cards by stealth, with no debate and unclear privacy safeguards”

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