debian 8.1.0 jessie - sudo fix (not installed by default)

edited July 2016 in VPN Setup Support Posts: 73

Debian seems to not have sudo installed by default. 
Here is how to install sudo and add your username to the sudoers file.
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Things highlighted in yellow are commands to be executed in the terminal
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Things highlighted in violet are to be pressed on the keyboard
Things highlighted in grey are showing output


Open the Terminal
    - Click "Activities"
    - Click in the "Type to search..." box
    - Type in "Terminal" and press the [enter] key

Switch to root user
    - Type in the Terminal the following command
        su
    - then press [enter]
    - now type in the root password and press [enter]
        - The command prompt should now look like this...
            root@debian:/home/yourusernamehere#
    
Install "sudo"
    - Now that you are root user within the Terminal lets install "sudo"
    - Type in the following command...
        apt-get install sudo
    - then press [enter]

Add your username to the sudo group
    - Type in the following command...
        adduser yourusernamehere sudo
    - then press [enter]
    
Now add your name to /etc/sudoers file
    - Type in the following command...
        nano /etc/sudoers
    - then press [enter]
    - Scroll down and look for the line "%sudo  ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL"
    - Below that line type in the following...
        yourusernamehere  ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL
    - Press "Ctrl+x" then press "y" and then press [enter] to exit and save the file
    
Now we exit out of the Terminal completely
    - Type in the following command...
        exit
    - then press [enter]
    - Type exit again...
        exit
    - then press [enter]
    - That should have closed the Terminal application
    
Now let's open a new Terminal and test to see if sudo is working for your user name
    - Click "Activities"
    - Click in the "Type to search..." box
    - Type in "Terminal" and press the [enter] key
    - Test sudo by typing the following command...
        sudo ls
    - then press [enter]
    - type in your password and press [enter]

    - If the output looks like the following...
        yourusernamehere is not in the sudoers file.  This incident will be reported.
    - then you might have to start from the beginning of these instructions and try again.

    - If the output looks like this...
        Desktop  Documents  Downloads  Music  Pictures  Public  Templates  Videos
    - Your username now has sudo rights, congratulations!

Enjoy!

image

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Post edited by WinstonSmith on

Comments

  • Just an FYI, debian will install sudo during installation if you do not specify a root password when prompted.
  • Just an FYI, debian will install sudo during installation if you do not specify a root password when prompted.
    Thank you thatguychuck!
  • Posts: 1
    Wow ... someone who caters for novies like me ... and it worked!!

    Very Grateful

    B_BBQ

  • Wow ... someone who caters for novies like me ... and it worked!!

    Very Grateful

    B_BBQ

    Thank you B_BBQ!  Your nice words encourage me to continue.  :)
  • hey, just some thoughts/tips. (i've been a debian user/worker/sysadmin for a long time now.)

    if you're going to use sudo the recommended way to edit the sudoers file is using visudo instead of nano. (https://wiki.debian.org/sudo)

    It's also sometimes better to avoid sudo all together and just use su. (https://wiki.debian.org/Root)

    You also don't actually need to edit the sudoers file, you can just add yourself to the sudo group.
    su - && aptitude install sudo && adduser myusername sudo

    after you're in the group you need to logout and back in then you're good.
  • hey, just some thoughts/tips. (i've been a debian user/worker/sysadmin for a long time now.)

    if you're going to use sudo the recommended way to edit the sudoers file is using visudo instead of nano. (https://wiki.debian.org/sudo)

    It's also sometimes better to avoid sudo all together and just use su. (https://wiki.debian.org/Root)

    You also don't actually need to edit the sudoers file, you can just add yourself to the sudo group.
    su - && aptitude install sudo && adduser myusername sudo

    after you're in the group you need to logout and back in then you're good.
    Thanks waarden,

    I will try these tips the next time I work with a fresh copy of Jessie.

    w
  • edited May 2016 Posts: 3

    Post edited by Isidro on
  • Posts: 3

  • Posts: 3
    Isidro said:


  • Dear Winston, It worked!
    Thanks for this great solution
    greetings from Hans (The Netherlands)
  • Posts: 1
    Very nicely explained.
    Thanks :)
  • Posts: 4
    waarden said:
    hey, just some thoughts/tips. (i've been a debian user/worker/sysadmin for a long time now.)

    if you're going to use sudo the recommended way to edit the sudoers file is using visudo instead of nano. (https://wiki.debian.org/sudo)

    It's also sometimes better to avoid sudo all together and just use su. (https://wiki.debian.org/Root)

    You also don't actually need to edit the sudoers file, you can just add yourself to the sudo group.
    su - && aptitude install sudo && adduser myusername sudo

    after you're in the group you need to logout and back in then you're good.

    @WinstonSmith

    Ideally /etc/sudoers.d/ should be used for maximum portability -- and incidentally avoid messing up with the main configuration file.

    Another good practice when working as root is to start with an as much as possible clean environment so $ su - would fit best on most situations.

    HTH
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